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Bit and collet nut stuck Expand / Collapse
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Posted 10/8/2007 12:50:36 PM
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I own two Dremels: a Multi -Pro 395, and a Stylus 1100.  My husband gave those two Dremel to me as presents because I'm an avid crafter and I treasure both of them.  I was using the Stylus while doing some wood carving during the weekend and after replacing the bit two times before, I tried to replace for another bit a third time and it became stuck.  After trying many times to remove just the bit unsuccessfully, I tried to remove the collet nut so I then I could try to remove the bit, but no luck.  I also tried putting a bit of my sewing machine oil to see if it would help, but it didn't work either.  The tool is working fine in any other way, it turns on and off fine and all the speeds are working properly, but the bit and the collet nut are completely stuck. I'm desperate, please help me!!! 
Post #2705
Posted 4/14/2009 6:27:40 PM


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I have had similar problems wit my bits getting stuck in the collet so I tried using the keyless chuck. These worked well for me but the chuck would only last a few months and them the 1/8 bits would no longer go into the chuck. On my first chuck I tried to force the 1/8 bit into the chuck and bent the springs.

On my second third and forth chucks (all with in a 14 month period) the same thing happened. The chucks will still work on the thinner bits, but some times will slip. I Think that perhaps I should contact Dremel as, for me, on a very fixed income, I can become expensive.

Don't get me wrong, The keyless chuck is a g-d send when you are constantly changing bits.

Gary

Post #5557
Posted 9/12/2009 8:12:40 PM
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Both of you folks sound like you have the same problem. Stuff from whatever you guys are working on is getting jammed in the working parts. Keep a very small brass bristled wire brush at your work station (for the lady with the sticking collets). Debris will get caught in the threads and eventually cause the collet nut to get stiff or not turn at all. Use the wire brush every once and a while to gently clean out the threads that the collet nut runs on. It will help immensely with jamming.

I also keep a 3/8 inch open ended wrench at my work station for UNDOING the collet for when it gets stuck anyway because I was lazy with cleaning. I still use the provided wrench from Dremel to tighten the nut. I'm concerned that using a full sized wrench to tighten the collet nut will damage the threads on the moto tool over time from over-tightening.

A similar problem occurs with the chuck. As you use the dremel, stuff works it's way up into the moving parts. When you open the chuck all the way for 1/8 bits you pack the debris in there until it will no longer accept the larger shafts. Keep a can of compressed air (such as is used for cleaning out computers) at your workstation to clean out the chuck when you're done with it for the day. One little puff for a second or so should do it

Please wear safety glasses as the debirs that may be caught in the chuck can fly out into your face and get in your eye.

You may also be able to free up your jammed chuck by soaking it in a small container of solvent. This MAY get the stuff that's jammed in there already out. Soak it OUTDOORS as the fumes may be flammable, and I KNOW the fumes from most all solvents are bad to breath. Good ventilation is your friend.

Wear eye-protection and blow the solvent out of the works of the chuck after it's soaked for a while (Again, outdoors, with safety glasses please) with your duster-can. Let the chuck dry out for a day or so in a well ventilated area . Solvent can be stinky.

Use a VERY small amount of graphite spray in the chuck if it's stiff after cleaning. (The spray dries to a thin powder film and does not attract new dirt to jam up your nice clean chuck! This type of spray WILL leave dark grey stuff all over your fingers that looks like ink) A very good quality silicon-based spray is also acceptable for lubricating. The silicon is much cleaner. Lubricate outdoors please.
Post #6011
Posted 9/14/2009 5:04:12 PM
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Dear ve3rin and Ornathoid:

Thanks guys for your attention. My husband and I got to fix the problem I was having with my cordless Dremel. He held it firmly with a locking plier while I carefully got to unscrew and remove the bit that was stuck. I was very nervous because I feared the Dremel would be torn into pieces, but thanks God, didn't happen.

Thanks Ornathoid for your advice, appreciated. You're right, I've always been very careful with my tools and machines. I have two sewing machines, one is 20 years old and the other is 14, and I've never needed a technician. The same with my serger that is 11 years old. I keep them very clean and oiled, the same with all the craft tools I constantly use. Never putthem away until they are very clean. Apparently the problem was that inadvertently I screwed it in too hard. There's always a first time to make mistakes, I'll make sure it will never happen again.

Thanks.
Post #6021
Posted 11/11/2009 5:32:01 PM
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Ornathoid (9/12/2009)
Keep a very small brass bristled wire brush at your work station (for the lady with the sticking collets). Debris will get caught in the threads and eventually cause the collet nut to get stiff or not turn at all. Use the wire brush every once and a while to gently clean out the threads that the collet nut runs on. It will help immensely with jamming.


Stupid question of the week

What exactly are the threads and where are they located?

Post #6198
Posted 7/1/2010 8:06:03 PM
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Usually, when I come across something I cant figure out, I hit the forums of the product to find out if I am the only one who has the issue.  I see 2000 others hit this so I will give my best shot at how to fix this collet sticking--------------get the engineer who designed this and have him try to twist the collet off using small pliers with the wrench.  Even after WD40 on the bit end doesnt help and tapping a tad wont, you can always get on the net and write like I am.

Suggestion Dremel-----get more meat on that shaft adding a hex end on the bottom below the collet so you can grab with 2 wrenchs and turn it.  Since I still have a brand new Dremel sitting on my desk with a stuck collet with the bit, please give me a better idea how to grab the shaft and twist off the collet with regular tools one has around the house.  Forgot holding the button while I turn the wrench, this is where it started when the collet wouldnt budge and the shaft now goes around the button.  I guess a little too much torque from the wrench.  

 

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