Dremel Message Board
Home       Members    Calendar    Who's On
Welcome Guest ( Login | Register )
        


««123»»

Dremel for Stone & Rock Carving? Expand / Collapse
Author
Message
Posted 6/13/2009 12:08:52 PM


Forum Newbie

Forum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum Newbie

Group: Forum Members
Last Login: 6/23/2009 2:23:46 PM
Posts: 2, Visits: 8
Newbie, you asked many of the questions that I have had. Doug, your answers were very helpful. I am checking out the other two messages you mentioned, and they are excellent too.

Just wanted to say thanks! I think this message board rocks!

Post #5704
Posted 6/14/2009 7:34:51 AM


Supreme Being

Supreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme Being

Group: Banned Members
Last Login: 11/15/2012 8:44:25 PM
Posts: 1,196, Visits: 4,842
Thanks and welcome to the message board.

Doug


Post #5714
Posted 8/20/2009 7:29:21 AM
Forum Newbie

Forum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum Newbie

Group: Forum Members
Last Login: 8/20/2009 7:22:30 AM
Posts: 2, Visits: 4
Ploni

I go to my local Lapidary supply.  Most of them carry a wide varity of stones for polishing.  Most all of them can be carved.  I make jewelery from stones.

Captain Art

Captain Art

Post #5927
Posted 9/13/2009 5:52:47 PM
Forum Newbie

Forum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum Newbie

Group: Forum Members
Last Login: 9/14/2009 9:00:44 AM
Posts: 1, Visits: 3
Just a note on hardness. As you all know, the hardness of a mineral is its resistance to abrasion (and therefore its resistance to being carved by the Dremel). The Mohs Hardness Scale is one of the scales used, is the most popular, and goes from 1-10. Talc=1, Gypsum=2, Calcite=3, Fluorite=4, Apatite=5, Orthoclase (Feldspar)=6, Quartz=7, Topaz=8, Corundum=9, Diamond=10.
Agate, chert, jasper, et. al. usually have a hardness of 7 becuase they are made of quartz. Limestone and marble have a hardness of 3 because they are made of calcite.
When it comes to rocks, it is difficult to assign a specific hardness to them because they are usually made of more than one mineral; thus, they have varying hardness. For example, granite is commonly made of quartz(H=7), orthoclase feldspar(H=6), plagioclase feldspar(H=6), and +/- biotite(H=3-3.5) and hornblende(H=6). So, generally speaking, granite is definitely a hard rock. However, many metamorphic rocks have the same minerals as granite, making them equally as hard. Many sedimentary rocks are made mostly of quartz, but are cemented with calcite. I hope you can see the difficulty that is present when one is trying to carve a rock with the Dremel. Many rocks are made of minerals that have wide-ranging hardness.
I am just beginning to polish and carve rocks with the Dremel, which is why I'm on this forum. However, I have been studying rocks in detail for 18 years.
I hope this information helps.

cheers,
Chas
Post #6016
Posted 9/13/2009 6:43:05 PM
Forum Newbie

Forum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum Newbie

Group: Forum Members
Last Login: 9/14/2009 3:41:45 PM
Posts: 1, Visits: 16
Doug,

I am new to the board and the Dremel and I would like to get to the above site you recommended, but I can't find it. It is probably so obvious I just don't see it.

Thanks,
Cindy
Post #6017
Posted 9/15/2009 7:20:33 AM


Supreme Being

Supreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme Being

Group: Banned Members
Last Login: 11/15/2012 8:44:25 PM
Posts: 1,196, Visits: 4,842
The best way to learn is to practice and try different bits until you find the ones that work for you.

Doug


Post #6022
Posted 10/28/2009 1:03:21 PM
Forum Newbie

Forum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum Newbie

Group: Forum Members
Last Login: 10/28/2009 12:50:03 PM
Posts: 1, Visits: 4
Hola Doug!  My name is David and I am interested in learning to carve using a dremel or flex shaft.  My problem is I dont know where to begin.  Do you know of any current publication which could help.  Also, since the hardest material I will be carving is corundum I am going to need diamond bits.  Now I know I am going to need one that will take off the bulk of the unwanted stone to basically rough out the shape I want but after that I do not know what diamond tip bits of various shapes sizes and grit I will need.  Could ya help a brother out?  I have been making jewelry for some time now and have a golden op to work with some body piercing shops supplying them with stone versions of what they already sell.  I have a wide selection of rough a vivid imagination and a  steady hand.  I think I can do this if I were just to be pointed in the right direction.  I know I am going to have to experiment some with the various bits to see what they can do but I am looking for the little bit of guidance to kick start this new and fascinating hobby. Alas it seems all I can find is info on woodworking which is a totally different animal altogether.  Any help and guidance would be greatly appreciated.  Thank you in advance for anything you may provide me with that would be helpful.  Caveman Dave

Caveman Dave says to all you big wave surfers 'Ride the wild wahini'! And best of wishes to all I hope you find joy in this art form and possibly make some money while your at it.
Post #6119
Posted 10/28/2009 3:01:09 PM


Supreme Being

Supreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme Being

Group: Banned Members
Last Login: 11/15/2012 8:44:25 PM
Posts: 1,196, Visits: 4,842
Ok Dave here we go the #85422 silicon carbide grinding stone can be used to remove some of the overburden.

The diamond wheel points come in many shapes and sizes go to a big chain store like lowes or wal-mart or home depot to see the whole selection that they have.

This should get you started on rock carving. If you need more just ask.......Doug

Doug


Post #6120
Posted 12/4/2009 7:58:26 PM
Forum Newbie

Forum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum Newbie

Group: Forum Members
Last Login: 4/25/2010 8:58:18 PM
Posts: 2, Visits: 100
****o, I'm a newbie.

I inherited a 50+ yr. old rock collection and have decided it's time somebody does something with them.

Many of the stones are beautiful: agates, quartz, sliced geodes, whole geodes, chunks of raw tigereye, agates out the wazoo, some finished cabs. I got the hubby go-ahead to get a dremel so I can polish some of them and drill holes in an attempt to turn them into jewelry as I learn more about rocks in general.

What would be a good dremel to start with and what assortment of bits for polishing cut stone, or partially tumbled stones? For carving? For drilling?

How about books on techniques, identification, etc?

TIA,

Tammis

Post #6307
Posted 1/6/2011 4:37:13 PM
Forum Member

Forum MemberForum MemberForum MemberForum MemberForum MemberForum MemberForum MemberForum Member

Group: Forum Members
Last Login: 11/29/2013 2:29:08 AM
Posts: 45, Visits: 40
Start with carving some soapstone. It is fun to do and you can purchase it at many artist supply stores such as Dick Blick. It is soft, the carved off debris turns to talcum powder when carving or sawing. You can cut down big chunks to smaller sizes using a hand saw.

Karin
Post #7513
« Prev Topic | Next Topic »

««123»»

Reading This Topic Expand / Collapse
Active Users: 1 (1 guest, 0 members, 0 anonymous members)
No members currently viewing this topic.
Forum Moderators: AlyssaCicero

Permissions Expand / Collapse

All times are GMT -6:00, Time now is 11:59pm

Powered by InstantForum.NET v4.1.4 © 2014
Execution: 0.172. 12 queries. Compression Disabled.
Dremel Gear | Product Registration | History | Media | Careers
Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Copyright © 2005, Robert Bosch Tool Corporation. All Rights Reserved.