dremel redesign


dremel redesign

Author
Message
idguy10
View Quick Profile

Junior Member
Junior Member (21 reputation)Junior Member (21 reputation)Junior Member (21 reputation)Junior Member (21 reputation)Junior Member (21 reputation)Junior Member (21 reputation)Junior Member (21 reputation)Junior Member (21 reputation)Junior Member (21 reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Last Active: 10 Years Ago
Posts: 1, Visits: 2
I am working on redesigning the current line of dremels for a college design project. I have been going through these message boards, reading up on what people have been having problems with regarding the usage of a dremel. I would greatly appreciate any suggestions and/or comments about what you would like to see improved. Thanks.
woodworm
View Quick Profile

Supreme Being
Supreme Being (1.2K reputation)Supreme Being (1.2K reputation)Supreme Being (1.2K reputation)Supreme Being (1.2K reputation)Supreme Being (1.2K reputation)Supreme Being (1.2K reputation)Supreme Being (1.2K reputation)Supreme Being (1.2K reputation)Supreme Being (1.2K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Last Active: 8 Years Ago
Posts: 51, Visits: 344
Start with more reliable bearings.

More rugged switch, built with longer life intended. That little switch system in the 395 when I first seen it I though I had just opened up a cheap tin whistle. Not even close to what I expected Dremel to come up with.

Brushes could be made to last longer.

Perhaps when overheating is an issue (as has been my problem) design the unit to run cooler over long periods of time.

My Dremel will run steady pretty much for 2- 3 hours at a time.

I change bits frequently and heating has been a problem.

Also the upper bearing is held in an rubber bearing cushion (395) this rubber has been failing due to overheating of the bearing. Also probably because I have had to add a durable oil to the bearing to get more life out of it because you can't get bearings anymore.

And yep -- you guessed it -- if you are going to make a tool with the intention of it lasting, ensure you have spare parts or your competion will.

But don't be depressed -- they can't even make a tea pot that doesn't drip when you pour.

Or at least I haven't seen one.

Good luck -- if you build high quality no one will be able to afford it, and you won't make any money where the money is made on manufactured goods. In the spare parts.

Dremyfan
View Quick Profile

Supreme Being
Supreme Being (4.4K reputation)Supreme Being (4.4K reputation)Supreme Being (4.4K reputation)Supreme Being (4.4K reputation)Supreme Being (4.4K reputation)Supreme Being (4.4K reputation)Supreme Being (4.4K reputation)Supreme Being (4.4K reputation)Supreme Being (4.4K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Last Active: 5 Years Ago
Posts: 225, Visits: 412
Hi Woodworm! If you find a good English made teapot you will be pleased to have a good cup of tea without drops falling over your tablecloth when you serve it. At least it has been so in my experience down here in Argentina. It would be a good point to find out their secret but I´m afraid that it took centuries of experimenting.

Let me say also that you made a good point referring to the 395's manufacturing. Perhaps in these hard times our opinions are taken into consideration.

Pleased to read your inputs in this forum,

Enrique

woodworm
View Quick Profile

Supreme Being
Supreme Being (1.2K reputation)Supreme Being (1.2K reputation)Supreme Being (1.2K reputation)Supreme Being (1.2K reputation)Supreme Being (1.2K reputation)Supreme Being (1.2K reputation)Supreme Being (1.2K reputation)Supreme Being (1.2K reputation)Supreme Being (1.2K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Last Active: 8 Years Ago
Posts: 51, Visits: 344
To be truthful, I don't drink tea.

The old saying used to be -- we can put a man on the moon but we can't make a teapot that doesn't drip when you pour.

Anyway -- back to Dremel.

I have been nursing my Dremel along lubing the bearings with a product called "Power Up". (Don't know where you get it or who makes it). I bought a gallon of it for 70 dollars (pricy) about 10 years ago from a traveling snake charmer. The demo was that impressive.

It will take grinding bearings and they will run smooth again.

(Or at least so in my Dremel). But it is hard on rubber,gaskets and such.

I also had the switch burn out so I opened up the Dremel, removed the switch completely, jump wiped the contacts so it would run full RPM when plugged in.

I then took a 5 amp variable speed controller and plugged my Dremel into it.

I do not get the variaty of speed control that the original Dremel switch gave me, but I do get what I need. Full RPM down to about half.

The main reason I did this --- one look at that switch and I knew it wasn't worth the money to replace it.

I don't recommend anyone fooling around with wiring, unless you have electrical know how.

I am not saying I do -- just saying I like fooling around with wiring.

No , I don't have my first dollar, but I do have some of the change.

Wink

woodworm
View Quick Profile

Supreme Being
Supreme Being (1.2K reputation)Supreme Being (1.2K reputation)Supreme Being (1.2K reputation)Supreme Being (1.2K reputation)Supreme Being (1.2K reputation)Supreme Being (1.2K reputation)Supreme Being (1.2K reputation)Supreme Being (1.2K reputation)Supreme Being (1.2K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Last Active: 8 Years Ago
Posts: 51, Visits: 344
woodworm (4/23/2009)
To be truthful, I don't drink tea.

 completely, jump wiped the contacts so it would run full RPM when plugged in.

Wink

Sorry for the mispell  --  that should read --  "jump wired" the contacts.

I tried to edit my post but that is not an option for some reason.

And as I write this I notice the little "spell check" box at the bottom.

What can I say --- it's been a long life. ahhhhhhhhhhhh

peakdesign
View Quick Profile

Junior Member
Junior Member (19 reputation)Junior Member (19 reputation)Junior Member (19 reputation)Junior Member (19 reputation)Junior Member (19 reputation)Junior Member (19 reputation)Junior Member (19 reputation)Junior Member (19 reputation)Junior Member (19 reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Last Active: 10 Years Ago
Posts: 1, Visits: 3
I imagine there are really two type of users. The people who run it day in day out like you, and the people like me who run it occasionally, and are still walking around looking for applications, like low cost dentistry for the neighbors, trepanation of pets, etc.



It's hard to meet both markets' needs with the same gear. That's key to pricing and design. I need it to run like a champ and do everything precisely, but not for long periods, and, frankly, durability to wear is not essential, though parts that break quickly are totally demoralizing. I like the drill press, that's good-enough design and a good deal, I love the flex cable, and I occasionally buy bits, etc.



How much am I willing to pay to have it last 20 years instead of the current warranty 5? Hard to say. I think the pricing they have now is about right, but their out of warranty service "max" is a bit high, being almost equal to the street cost of the item.







woodcutr
View Quick Profile

Supreme Being
Supreme Being (1K reputation)Supreme Being (1K reputation)Supreme Being (1K reputation)Supreme Being (1K reputation)Supreme Being (1K reputation)Supreme Being (1K reputation)Supreme Being (1K reputation)Supreme Being (1K reputation)Supreme Being (1K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Last Active: 8 Years Ago
Posts: 57, Visits: 539
Not trying to get off subject but going back to the design question; I had occasion to use a B&D tool the other day with a friend . It had a toggle type switch on the rotor that held the shaft while the chuck was opened to change bits.I was impressed by two points.

Once engaged, I could leave it and know it would hold, allowing me to use both hands to change bits. After changing the bit and tightening the chuck , It's position was a clear sign to release it and get back to work. The chuck was also an nice standard feature, working on finger pressure and eliminating multiple collets or an accessory chuck to replace same.

Overall, it seemed like an improvement area Dremel should consider. 

woodcutr Wink

wood tnr
View Quick Profile

Forum Guru
Forum Guru (69 reputation)Forum Guru (69 reputation)Forum Guru (69 reputation)Forum Guru (69 reputation)Forum Guru (69 reputation)Forum Guru (69 reputation)Forum Guru (69 reputation)Forum Guru (69 reputation)Forum Guru (69 reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Last Active: 9 Years Ago
Posts: 3, Visits: 18
looking for a carbide tip saw blade for cutting sheet metal-just like on circular saws.


Reading This Topic