Is it possible to engrave a stainless watch?


Is it possible to engrave a stainless watch?

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rellypi
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For my boyfriends birthday I recently purchased a Eco-Citizen Stainless Steel watch, and a dremel 4000 with accessories (drill press, routing table, etc). I had the intention to engrave the back of the watch (still havent checked if theres room but hoping there is). However, the engraving attachment says to not use on steel. I dont want to break the watch!



Thanks for anyhelp Smile
AlienPizza
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First of all, practice engraving on a scr@p piece of steel using the smallest stone or diamond bit in your kit. Get a feel for how the operation will behave using different speeds, and different bits. Some might give you that nice smooth feel that is comfortable for what you want to do, but may leave a little larger mark than what you want, or even dig in and track wildly across the work-piece.

Once you have the confidence to do what you want, then nearly anything is possible. Stainless steel is really not too different than other steel alloys, it has been surface-treated with an acid bath to leave that nice smooth shiny surface. Just remember that you can take material away, but you cannot put it back.

I have used the technique of marking a piece of tape with the design on it and engraving through that to make a design, but the results are a bit discouraging. I find that using a super-fine Sharpie marker to mark the design and softly and carefully grinding away the markings gives excellent results. If you have the talent to keep the tool steady and have the patience to not rush the job, the practice piece might give the results you seek.

Professional engravers have been known to use templates and pantographs (described elsewhere in this forum) in order to achieve consistent results.

Do not be discouraged by your practice results, but learn from them and you will have what you seek to accomplish.

I wish you Good Luck in your trials, and welcome you to the Dremel community.












cut to fit, file to match, paint to hide


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